Halting soil erosion

Without good management of the land, soil can also be eroded by wind and rain - FAO/Giulio Napolitano

Without good management of the land, soil can also be eroded by wind and rain
© FAO/Giulio Napolitano

In this month's Agfax, our correspondent in Tanzania, Lazarus Laiser, travels to a small village on the outskirts of Arusha, to see the destruction that soil erosion can cause for himself. Listen to 'Halting soil erosion' to hear what smallscale farmers can do to halt the process of soil erosion, and restore degraded soils.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Interview by:
Country:
Tanzania
Duration:
4'26"
Date published:
April 2008
 
 
 

Broadcast information

Suggested introduction:

The thin skin of top soil around the earth supports all life on the planet. It provides plants with the essential nutrients they need for growth. But without care, the level of nutrients decline and soil becomes degraded making it more difficult to produce a good crop. Without good management of the land, soil can also be eroded by wind and rain.

In Tanzania, Lazarus Laiser went to one small, windy, village where soil erosion is very marked. On a tour given by Lomavani Laizer, a local researcher from the Ekenywa Tree planting project, Lazarus discovers what soil erosion means, how it happens - but importantly what can be done to combat it.

Tape in:
This area is really ruined...
Tape out:
...for feeding the animals.
Duration:
4'26"

Closing Announcement:

That was Lazarus Laiser speaking to Lomavani Laizer, a local researcher from the Ekenywa Tree planting project in Tanzania. Are there any soil conservation projects near you, or do you have any advice for fellow farmers on methods of preventing soil erosion?

 

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